NRA supporters blow up Yeti coolers after end of discount program

The National Rifle Association is hot and bothered after cooler company Yeti is putting its relationship on ice.

The NRA posted a peeved statement on its website late last week saying that the company no longer wishes to be a vendor for the lobbying group but did not explain why.

Former NRA President Marion Hammer said that the decision, which comes after the NRA has been criticized for attacks on survivors of the Parkland school shooting, “isn’t sportsmanlike.”

Some supporters upset that they would have fewer Yeti sightings associated with the gun industry called for a boycott of the goods, which are hard-sided coolers popular at tailgates and other parties.

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Expressions of outrage included some people crushing or blowing up Yeti coolers, which cost hundreds of dollars.

“This YETI ain’t ready,” South Carolina man Bryan Atkinson said on Facebook before opening fire on a cooler filled with explosives.

One NRA supporter in South Carolina blew up a Yeti cooler because of the news.

One NRA supporter in South Carolina blew up a Yeti cooler because of the news.

(Facebook)

“YETI can’t stand behind the NRA, I ain’t standing behind YETI no more.”

Yeti said in a statement that the change came as it eliminated “a group of outdated discounting programs” and that the NRA statement was “inaccurate.”

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It said that the NRA foundation was still offered a “customization” program that many other organizations are offered, and that it supports the Second Amendment of the Constitution.

Though it says the organization was not targeted, the beverage cooling brand is the latest in a string of companies to alter its dealings with the NRA after the Parkland massacre.

Airlines such Delta and United as well as MetLife and several car rental companies announced they were ending discount programs. Retailers such as Walmart and Dick’s Sporting Goods made changes to their policies on selling assault weapons.

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